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CompIQ TWAIN Dual Band / Stacked Compressor for Bass and Guitar

289,00

You can order this product in the USA from Gear Hero HQ.

The CompIQ TWAIN is a precision tool for dynamic audio processing of bass and guitar signals (but not only) which gives tremendous control over compression parameters, and then some. This is a sophisticated device. A good understanding of compression is normally required to optimally set it up for live performance or studio recording.

Premier Guitar - Bass Review - CompIQ TwainI was instantly struck by how musical my intentionally heavy squash on the low register sounded. The popped notes  fit better into the line I was playing, a bit like slapping through a tube preamp.

Gitarre und Bass Magazine - Test Review - June 2020 IssueI am not aware of any analog devices that offer a similar range of functions and, despite the numerous possibilities, they can be set quite intuitively.

Guitar Magazine Editor's ChoiceThe Twain cooks up every style of guitar compression we can think of – from subtle detail enhancement through Lowell George and onto brickwall limiting with unlimited sustain.

Compressor Pedal Reviews - CompIQ TwainIf you are into compression, this is in a league of its own. It forges a new path. I can’t think of another compressor currently on the market that offers as much as the Twain.

It features adaptive auto-attack & release timing presets and independent compression controls for knee, threshold, ratio, and make-up gain – on each band. It can work as a dual-band compressor/limiter with variable crossover point, or as a stacked compressor with separate controls for each analog engine – at the flick of a switch. In either mode, harmonic saturation can be injected on each of the dry line band’s, and then be mixed to taste with the wet compressed line for perfect tonal balance. Separate gain reduction displays make the compression effect visible, so you can always know how hard or soft the lows and highs are processed.

 Manual
 Setting examples and additional info
 Video demo
 What people say
 CompIQ 101
 Compare compressors

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BECOS Effects

Description

Designed around the highest performance Analog Engines® from THAT Corp., the CompIQ TWAIN provides compression controls only found in studio gear. Beside dual-band processing, the two independent analog engines can be fully stacked (in series), achieving the compression warmth particular to slower optical compressors – a feature rarely seen in a pedal, and never before available with this level of tweaking.

Guitar Magazine Gear Of The Year 2020 - Becos CompIQ Twain - Recommended If you feel like your stompbox compressor doesn’t give you enough control, this could be the answer to your prayers and then some. The Twain is more like a multi-band mastering compressor than the units most guitarists will be familiar with. It’s ideally suited to the twin challenges of wider frequency and dynamic range presented by active basses. A remarkably versatile compressor pedal with a low noise floor and pristine audio quality.

The CompIQ TWAIN goes beyond just compression and steps into EQ/Preamp territory by enhancing the instrument’s tone without the need for a dedicated EQ. Slightly unbalancing the level of processing on each frequency band means you can either enhance or tame Lows or Highs. And because you can do this on the Dry-line as well – by using the Cut filters or Boost levels of the Saturation section -, you can separately blend Lows and/or Highs over the compressed Wet-line. The result of this processing adds a dynamic coloring to the tone, but careful balancing can also preserve the original voicing of the instrument. This feature is especially useful in Stacked processing mode, where you may trade some frequencies for the elastic compression feel. These can be easily restored by only mixing back what is missing.

Block Diagram for the CompIQ TWAIN Pro Dual-Band / Stacked Compressor Pedal

A preamp section allows the trimming of the input signal’s level.  This can be used to control how hard the compressors are pushed up-front. Strong signals can sometimes activate compression too early, so down to -9dB of padding is available. Weaker instrument signals can be doubled in amplitude with up to +6dB of gain. The preamp affects both the Wet and Dry line, and here the saturation engines are also responding to trimming. Sometimes, the trimmer can be used as a one-knob balancer when switching from one instrument to another.

A Side-Chain Filter with three presets is available for Lows processing only. This helps to recover punchy transients that are lost during higher compression, but it can also be used as a stand-alone blooming audio effect. By slightly delaying compression on the low-frequency spectrum – which is still being touched by the make-up gain -, the audio becomes fuller-sounding and more percussive. In Low (L) mode, the side chain’s first-order filter introduces a progressive attenuation into the control signal with the lowest point of -12dB@90Hz. This is more than enough to free up the momentary strokes on a bass instrument, or for percussive playing in general. If even more attenuation is needed in the side-chain, the Deep (D) filter dives to -12dB@200Hz, making this setting more usable for guitar or for bright basses.

Independent band-controls for Hard/Soft Knee selection, 50dB of Threshold range to accommodate not only instruments but also line-level sources, up-to-limiting continuous Ratio selection, and +20dB of Make-up Gain make the CompIQ TWAIN incredibly powerful and versatile. The Dynamic Auto Timing (Fast / Slower presets) also available for both bands reduces the setup complexity and provides a musical response, suitable for virtually any musical application.

Hear the sound on bass

Sound samples courtesy of Victor Brodén who wrote an in-depth Twain review in the Premier Guitar October 2020 Pedal Issue, p.116. The first take in each track is with the pedal in bypass, followed by another one with compression engaged. Details about the pedal settings for each recording in the Twain Settings Examples.

Premier Guitar - Becos CompIQ TWAIN Pro Compressors ReviewThe engineering feat is admirable. The number of features make this compressor hard to beat. The Becos shines in the heavier settings — compressing like some of the legendary rack units.

CompIQ Stella & CompIQ Twain reviewed by Gitarre & Bass Magazine 🇩🇪It’s amazing how many options Becos FX has put in these boxes. I am not aware of any analog devices that offer a similar range of functions and, despite the numerous possibilities, they can be set quite intuitively.

Becos CompIQ Twain Pro Compressor ReviewIf you are into compression, the Becos CompIQ Twain Pro Compressor is in a league of its own. The ability to run it in dual band mode or a stacked mode is killer. Though the Twain is a VCA based device, stacked mode makes the device feel and react more like an optical compressor, which it does well. 

Guitar.com - The level of control you have means that any dual-band application you can think of, the TWAIN can most likely handle.For any player that wants absolute precise control over their compression, this pedal should be perfect. In line with its predecessors in the CompIQ range, the face of the TWAIN is jam-packed with controls to manage your dynamics.

Guitar Pedal X - The new BECOS CompIQ TWAIN takes things further.The new CompIQ TWAIN takes things further. I dare say it may be a little much for some – but it has some amazing possibilities that I’ve not seen in another pedal format. If you are into compression – then this will give you more control than any other comparable pedal-based unit. Becos have steadily been building up a stellar reputation in this field.

Guitar World - Dual-band/stacked effect boasts two independent analog engines, controls for knee, threshold, ratio and make-up gain and much, much more.Dual-band/stacked effect boasts two independent analog engines, controls for knee, threshold, ratio and make-up gain and much, much more.

Pristine audio processing

The CompIQ series of compressors is not gonna alter the magic voice of your instrument. They preserve the original guitar or bass tone while providing unobstructed, pristine audio compression. The high dynamic range of these compressors allows for natural-sounding clean tones and low noise, artifact-free audio processing without the distortions usually introduced by optical compressors.

Key features

  • Dual-Band or Stacked compressor
  • Input Preamp with trimming for -9dB of attenuation and up to +6dB of gain
  • PEAK level indicator for signals above +0dBu
  • Two independent 4320 THAT Analog Engines® with RMS-level sensors coupled with high-performance Blackmer® VCA’s
  • Variable 70Hz to 1KHz Linkwitz–Riley Crossover
  • Independent Ratio, Threshold, and Make-up Gain
  • Independent Compression Knee (Soft/Hard)
  • Side Chain Frequency Compensation for balancing the triggering potential of Lows & Highs – equivalent to a frequency-based progressive threshold
  • Side Chain Filter (Normal / Low / Deep) on Lows engine
  • Independent Dynamic Auto Timing presets (Auto Fast / Auto Slower)
  • Dry / Wet Mix knob for parallel compression in either of the working modes
  • TapeSaturation analog circuitry with band-independent Saturation, Cut Filter (HPF on Lows, LPF on Highs) and Level controls to add harmonic distortions to the Dry Line, which then can be mixed with the compressed Wet Line
  • 6-LED gain reduction display on each processing engine
  • True Bypass on/off footswitch
  • 9-18V DC external power operation (power supply not included)
  • Road-ready, durable, black-powdered aluminum enclosure

More info

 Manual
 Setting examples
 Video demo
 Compare compressors

Additional information

Weight 0.45 kg
Dimensions 12 × 10.5 × 5.4 cm
Technical Specifications

Input impedance: > 1MΩ
Output Impedance: ~100Ω
0dB input reference level: -20dBu (0.0775Vrms)
Output noise: -95dBV @0dBV gain
THD: 0.05% for -5dBV input signal level @ 1kHz
Output frequency response: -1dB @ 20Hz; 0dB @ 65Hz – 25KHz
Power Voltage: 9VDC-18VDC(max), Center Negative Barrel
DC Power Plug Barrel: Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
Power Consumption: < 69mAh
Product Size: Length: 105mm, Depth: 120mm, Height: 54mm
Product Weight: 387 gr.
Packed Weight: 455 gr.
Packed Shipping Weight (one unit): 550 gr.

COMPIQ 101

The CompIQ series of compressors
Circuit Design
Dynamic Processing
Analog Engines
Variation Element
Side-Chain Detection
Side-Chain Filter
Side-Chain Frequency Compensation
Adjustable Input Level
Input Clipping LED
Crossover
Ratio
Threshold
Dynamic Auto Timing
Attack
Release
Make-up Gain
Compression Knee
EQ
EQ Bypass
Dry/Wet Mix
Saturation
Saturation EQ
Compression Display
9V Battery Operation
External DC Power
DC Power Plug Barrel
Current Consumption
Compressor / Limiter
Dual Band / Stacking
2
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Low / Deep
lows only
YES
-9dB to +6dB
> +6dBu signal levels
Linkwitz–Riley
70Hz to 1KHz
1:1 to inf:1
both bands
-40dBu to +10dBu
both bands
Auto Fast / Slower
both bands
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
-6dB to +20dB
both bands
Hard / Soft
both bands
Through Make-up Gains on Wet line (boost/cut)
-
YES
On Dry Line
adjustable
Lo / Hi Cut filters and Level controls
6-LED
both bands
-
9-18VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 69mA
Compressor / Limiter
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Low / Deep
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
-40dBu to +10dBu
Auto Fast / Slower
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
Manual: 0.12 ms/dB to 12 ms/dB
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
Manual: 1.2 ms/dB to 120 ms/dB
-6dB to +20dB
Hard / Soft
X-EQ +/-6dB with Low / Deep frequency pivots
YES
YES
On Dry Line
adjustable
Lo / Hi cut filters
(inside jumpers)
8-LED
YES
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 29mA
Compressor / Limiter
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Deep
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
-40dbu to +10dBu
Auto Fast / Slower
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
-6dB to +20dB
Hard / Soft
-
-
YES
-
-
5-LED
-
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 25mA
Compressor
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
Lo: -40dBu / Hi: -30dBu
Auto Slow
12ms
220ms
-6dB to +20dB
Hard
-
-
YES
-
-
5-LED
-
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 25mA
MINI Pro vs. other minions
Do you want to know more about mini compressor pedals? We compiled a Technical Shootout for most performance and popular mini compressor pedals available. Click here to find out how CompIQ MINI Pro stands out.
Blackmer® VCA
First developed by David Blackmer of dbx Inc., the original dbx 202 “Black Can” VCAs, can still be found in operating consoles today. These first VCAs suitable for pro audio equipment were built with a gain cell of eight discrete transistors. Later development of these IC’s surpassed all inconveniences of earlier designs, now rendering superior performances. CompIQ series of compressors use THAT Corporation Blackmer® VCAs which are characterized by an exponential control characteristic (gain varies directly in decibels), extremely wide dynamic range, and low signal distortion. They are particularly neutral in sound, adding little or no coloration to audio signals.
RMS-Level Sensor
Invented by David Blackmer of dbx Inc., the RMS-level detector computes Root Mean Square level of input signals in a logarithmic form, similar to how human ear perceives sound. The sound envelope decoded by this accurate detector is used to apply dynamic processing of the sound – the variation of signal level precisely controlled by the VCA according to parameters set by the user (Ratio, Threshold, Attack, Release, and Gain).
Threshold Range
The threshold’s 50dB of range is designed to accommodate very weak signals up to pro audio level signals. The +4dB pro signal line level is at the top of this range, and consequently at the far clockwise end of the threshold knob. This gives a huge amount of headroom for the instrument’s generated signals, which ensures the compressor is not distorting with high-level spikes. We didn’t want that, by design. Some other compressors distort a lot, for various reasons, and headroom (or lack of it) is one of them. The CompIQ line of compressors is made to accommodate either lower OR hotter signals, and that is the reason why it can also be used with synths or other line-level devices. We wanted that so that we cover a broad spectrum of usage. As opposed to this kind of design are the compressors which have a very low threshold set hard within the circuit, and they would be controlled through “compression variation” only. This is equivalent to setting our compressors with the lowest threshold, and then vary the compression amount with the Ratio control.

One other fact to point out is the range of a pickup signal, which is in the lower 25% of the pro signal level. This falls as well within the first quarter of the Threshold knob’s rotation range. The compression, or limiting, should only occur on peaks and for that matter, the optimum threshold point for a pickup is also in the lower setting on the Threshold knob, maybe between -30 to -20dBu (by design, this is also the reference level of the internal circuit). Around 8 or 9 o’clock, you are more than halfway within a pickup signal range. If you are to compress just peaks, you would set the threshold knob at about 9 o’clock or slightly above. At this level, a higher compression ratio makes no sense, unless is limiting you’re after. If you want to have a more audible feel of the compression, you would set the threshold knob below 9 o’clock, and the lower you go counterclockwise the smaller compression ratios you should use so that the pickup signal is not squashed too hard. Unless you want to use the squash as an effect! And here comes the “New York compression style” which means compress with a high ratio and low threshold, and mix the compressed wet signal with the dry signal.

Worth mentioning is that all CompIQ compressors have a hard-set signal level protection which is 1.2Vp-p or just around the pro signal level. For higher input levels than that, the circuit gets into distortion, which is generated by the protection and not within the compression electronics. Such protection is needed to avoid damages within the electronics due to input spikes or accidental DC leakage. Anyway, guitars and basses will not get to that top-level easily, unless they are put after a device that would be cranked up.

Side Chain Filter
Side Chain Filter is a feature which allows a change in the side chain compression triggering frequency filter.  The purpose is to delay the start of the compressor by the low frequency with high amplitude, which otherwise would clamp the higher frequencies too early. This results in a breathable type of compression, which has a particular sound characteristic, making it feel more natural to the ear. At the same time, the sound at the output may come out” fatter” or “punchier”. Side Chain HPF Options in CompIQ PRO Stella Compressor (-12dB at 90Hz & -12dB at 200Hz)

In CompIQ Stella, CompIQ Mini, and CompIQ Twain the SCF is switchable for a pre-set amount of low-cut of the triggering frequencies. The Normal option provides a general-purpose type of compression response which is frequency-compensated to resemble the human ear perception of sound, while Low and Deep options add a cut of -12dB@90Hz and -12dB@200Hz (-12dB@130Hz for the CompIQ Mini) on top of the Normal side chain curve, making it suitable for bass instruments.

Side Chain Frequency Compensation
Frequency Compensation  refers  to  the shape of the audio spectrum presented to the Side Chain Detector. Due to the nature of audio in general and musical instruments in particular, each musical note has a dominant frequency plus harmonics. The dominant frequency is always higher in amplitude than its harmonics. As musical notes fall lower in the audio spectrum (say notes on the lower strings in a guitar), their dominant frequency have bigger and bigger amplitudes (as opposed to notes on higher strings). That amplitude has the potential to trigger compression too early, and as a result, they may over-compress the harmonics or higher notes. This is usually heard by the human ear. To overcome this, we compensate for the low-frequency triggering potential, by progressively delaying it towards 1KHz, as the graph below shows. This is similar to say we apply a progressive threshold, where lower frequencies see a higher threshold than higher frequencies, which see a lower threshold proper for their lower amplitude. This type of progressive compensation helps prevent the “pumping” often encountered in compressors and makes the dynamic processing feel more natural. That is especially true for percussive instruments or for instruments rich in low frequencies, like bass. Side Chain HPF Options in CompIQ PRO Stella Compressor (-12dB at 90Hz & -12dB at 200Hz)

The Normal side-chain roll-off curve above is particular to all our compressors,  providing a general-purpose type of compression response that corresponds to how the human ear perceives the sound. In CompIQ Stella and CompIQ Twain the Side Chain Filter has two additional options: Low (-12dB per octave at 90Hz) and Deep (-12dB per octave at 200Hz) on top of the Normal curve. The Deep SCF is set to free -12dB per octave at 130Hz for the CompIQ Mini.

Crossover
The CompIQ Twain features a variable 70Hz to 1KHz Linkwitz–Riley type of crossover which splits the input signal into two frequency bands which are processed independently by the two compression engines. The output of the crossover also feeds the Dry Line, so mixing the Dry and Wet signals is possible without phase cancellations, regardless of the crossover’s set point.

Below is a plot showing matched external and internal circuit levels with the crossover set at 1KHz, the output set at the buffer level, and Mix set to 100% Wet. As you can see, the phase of each signal component is almost perfectly aligned in the audio spectrum.

Twain Crossover Phase Shift Plot

It is worth noting that while the input signal’s phase (dotted green) is a straight line, the output signal’s phase (dotted red) is progressively twisted from lows to highs (from almost 0° on the extreme lows up to 400° on the extreme highs). This is normal and is the result of the signal being separated by the crossover’s band filters, and then being re-combined at the output, after passing the compression engines. As a result, when switching from Bypass to Effect, the ear perceives the frequency delays although there is no audible loss of frequency throughout the audio spectrum.

Bellow is a drawing showing the Crossover Knob Frequency Scale and the most appropriate setting for using the Saturation feature.

CompIQ Twain Crossover Frequencies & Best Saturation Range

CompIQ Twain Crossover Frequencies & Best Saturation Range

Tape Saturation Lo & Hi-Cut filters
The Tape Saturation analog circuit acts only on the Dry signal. This optionally-saturated signal can then be mixed with the wet, compressed signal, to infuse harmonic distortions and warm-up the audio, without affecting the dynamics of the compressed signal. The headroom of the saturation circuit is pretty high, so you need to dial in some saturation before the effect is audible. Below you can see how the filters affect the frequencies of the Dry line.

The Low & High cut filters should be used only when Tape Saturation is used, otherwise, they will affect the clean dry line, although, that might also be a desirable way of using the Dry/Wet Mix control. The filters were necessary so that they would accommodate different types of audio sources, and respond musically without introducing unwanted fuzziness on the low end (especially for bass), or make it sound brittle (especially on bright guitar pickups).

X-EQ
The X-EQ section of the circuit is placed after the compressor, just before the Mix control, which means it acts on the wet signal only. When mixing the dry unprocessed signal, with the wet, compressed, and processed signal, the effect of the X-EQ is washed out little by little, as you introduce more dry signal.

The X-EQ on Stella has two frequency pivot points so that it will accommodate either bass (pivot at 330Hz, which corresponds to the higher note on the highest note of a 4 or 5 strings bass), or guitar (pivot at 1KHz, which corresponds to the highest note on a 20-fret guitar). In extreme settings (CC or CCW), there is a total difference of 12dB in between lows and highs. In the middle position of the X-EQ knob, the frequencies are not affected. The X-EQ section can be bypassed altogether by changing the position of a jumper inside the pedal.

Line-level signals
CompIQ series of compressors (both Stella and MINI) share the same core technology – sound wise they sound exactly the same. They have 50dB threshold range, from -40dB up to +10dB which is from average magnetic pickup level up to above line level. They both may be used on line-level FX Loops or hi-Z input on recording interfaces. Having an RMS-level detector, the compression is very accurate and the LED indication is very precise in that regard, as long as the input signal is at/around calibrated reference level. With line-level signals, which is way up, the LED’s will flash red more often, but there is nothing wrong with that. We did not provide means for re-calibrating the compression display at various signal levels because they were designed to be used mainly with instrument-level signals. CompIQ series “0dB input reference level” is hard-set at -20dBu (77.5mV). The total amount of compression depends on input signal level, usually 20dB for input signals around -20dBu (77.5mV) and around 36dB for +4dBu (1.228Vrms) input signal levels, all at inf:1 Ratio.
Compressor noise
The re-amplification of a weak signal – as compressed signal is – is the main source for noise in compressors. Some compressors might be described as noisier than others, but the fact is they all introduce noise with amplification (the amount of noise is also dependent on amplification circuit, FET-based amplification being potentially a bit noisier; in CompIQ compressors, amplification takes place in the VCA). To correctly compare compressor’s noise, they must be set for the same exact amount of threshold, ratio and make-up gain, and be fed the same reference signal. Some manufacturers limit the Ratio of their compressors to 7:1 or as low as 3:1 and those indeed make for “very silent compressors”. Of course in this regard the “silence” characteristic has a subjective meaning, if it’s not a misleading statement. As far as CompIQ compressors go, these are the facts:

  • at higher input signal levels, the makeup gain-related noise will be lower, because you deal with a bigger signal in the first place;
  • if you set a higher threshold, hard knee, and inf:1 ratio and you affect only the peak of the signals – as this limiting setup makes sense to be used – the noise will be inaudible.
  • for weak magnetic pickup signals, at the lowest set threshold and with ratios around 4:1 (which is a fair amount of compression), the CompIQ make-up gain will introduce noise similarly to studio-grade equipment.
  • on top of Threshold, you have the MIX control which helps reducing noise by blending in the dry signal;
  • using soft knee also contributes to reducing the need for make-up gain, so implicitly it reduces potential noise.
Switching noise
Pops or static noise may occur when switching the following settings with the pedal engaged:

  • Knee
  • Timing
  • Side Chain Filter
  • EQ Pivot
  • Dual-Band/Stacked
  • Power On/Off
Gain Reduction Meter
The gain reduction meter is available for all compressors in the CompIQ line. They measure how much compression is applied to the input signal. The indication is in dB. Depending on the product, the metering ladder is differently configured. Keep in mind that due to the limited number of LEDs in the meter, the compression is “invisible” in between the LEDs. Ideally, a full meter scale would have a minimum of 20 LEDs, one for each dB of reduction.

The metering in each product was designed and calibrated to reference the comparators to 9-12VDC for an accurate gain reduction indication. However, the CompIQ Twain can also be powered at 18VDC. At 18VDC, several thresholds that are calibrated for metering are a bit shifted, and as a result, the metering shows around -3dB less in the meter. Usually, a proper powering of an electronic circuit is with a fixed voltage +\- some tolerance. But 80-100% voltage up shifting, also shifts some calibrations within the blocks of circuits inside. While the audible side of the change is for the better and likable, the precision of the metering reacts to this shifting and introduces a variation.

There is a possibility that the meter LEDs remain “locked” lit in some conditions outside the normal usage of the pedal. For example, this may happen when powering the pedal at a higher voltage and switching the Knee in some particular circumstances such as when the knobs are set for compression but no input signal is present or input cable’s jack is not inserted in the pedal.

The gain reduction meter needs an input signal that varies up and down the thresholds set for each LED, and while a raising signal lits them, they must also be turned off by a decaying signal. The electric spike introduced by switching the knee (which is a change of the operation mode of a portion of a circuit while also setting the rest of the controls for compression) varies very shortly and it does trigger the LEDs although no signal on the input of the metering circuit is present so that the LED’s are reset. Nothing is broken and nothing breaks – is just a condition you put the circuits in, but that condition is different from the intended usage of the pedal.

To prevent that, switch the knee when you don’t play but you must have the input and output plugs inserted in the pedal. To switch off the LEDs that remain lit, power off the pedal and then on again OR, play your instrument with a signal higher than the LEDs on the display that remain lit. This way the circuit sees the decaying signal and the comparators are reset. Alternately, power the pedal with 9-12VDC instead of 18VDC.

Powering voltage range for the CompIQ line of compressors
Although all CompIQ line of pedals can be powered in the 9-18VDC range, we conservatively designed and calibrated some portion of the circuits (like the gain reduction meter) to be run in the 9-12VDC range. The headroom is more than enough at these voltages, and we can also protect the circuits in the long run from accidental failures of power supplies.

Please be sure you only use good quality and regulated power supplies because the 18VDC is the absolute maximum for some of the ICs inside. And although they might still support some minor voltage spikes, say at up to 10% you might still be safe, if the power supply spikes more or fails altogether and bursts a constant 20ish Volts into the pedal, then those active components might fail.

The circuits have other protections as well, like reverse polarity, yet there is a limit these protections can handle. That is valid for all our compressors.

Demos, reviews & comments

Blog post: The 101 of the CompIQ line of compressors

Settings Examples

Before you start

The CompIQ Twain is a sophisticated device which permits surgical intervention while preserving the dynamics of your playing. A good understanding of compression is normally required to optimally set it up for live performance or studio recording.

These settings are intended as starting examples. They could be used on bass, guitar, or other instruments. They might be more or less fitted for YOUR instrument, so you must explore and find out what works best for you, in your own setup. All controls are highly interactive. Small cumulative and compensating adjustments can render better results than turning knobs to extremes and expect wonders. We explained what we intended with these settings so you would better understand the controls and how they interact with each other.

We advise testing the CompIQ Twain with an instrument amplifier instead of using headphones. Start by playing with it alone then integrate your settings along with your other pedals.

Twain Block Diagram

To better understand the signal flow through the compressor’s analog engines take a look at the block diagram. You will note that regardless of the operation mode of the pedal – dual-band with variable frequency separation point or stacking the compression engines in series -, the Dry and Wet lines are always signal-phase correct, input to output. The additional level controls for each frequency band on the Dry line (which are part of the Saturation blocks) along with the independent dynamic frequency processing on the Wet line, plus the input Trim Gain that allows either the raise or attenuation of the input signal – they all contribute to giving the Twain an unprecedented power. Think of it not only as a compressor but also as a dynamic preamp. In many ways, Twain is unique.

Block Diagram for the CompIQ TWAIN Pro Dual-Band / Stacked Compressor Pedal

Here is the Twain Manual for your reference. For more in-depth technical info on our VCA line of compressors please take a look at the CompIQ 101 section. If you have particular questions regarding how Twain works, or you would like to share your feedback or your own settings to be added here, do not hesitate to contact us.

Matching the effect and bypass levels

To match the Wet, Dry, and Bypass levels, first set all knobs as suggested in the image. You will use the Mix, Trim, and Make-Up Gain knobs for this operation. The position of the knobs may vary slightly due to the potentiometer and parts tolerances.

Matching the Dry and Bypass signal levels

Be sure the Saturation engine’s knobs are all to a minimum because they all have an effect on the Dry line. Turn the Mix knob fully to the right for 100% Dry, then slightly turn the preamp’s Trim knob until Dry and Bypass signals match (Trim’s dial should be around 2’o’clock position). The Trim attenuates -9dB when fully counterclockwise and amplifies +6dB when fully clockwise.

Matching the Wet and Bypass signal levels

Leave the Trim knob untouched after the Dry line and Bypass levels are matched and turn the Mix knob fully to the left for 100% Wet. Set both Ratios to 1:1. Use the Make-up Gains to match the Bypass level. The Make-up Gains are at the buffer level at around 9’o’clock knobs position. With these settings, you should hear the same level for effect and bypass signal. If they are unbalanced,  be sure you have the Mix knob set fully to the Wet and slightly adjust the Make-up Gains. To verify the setting for both bands, turn the X-Over knob left and right – you should not hear any frequency-level changes, which indicate that both bands are leveled.

If the Trim knob is consequently changed, the Wet and Bypass levels must be re-matched.

Matching levels: Bypass = Wet = Dry

Using the crossover

When setting the crossover separation point, keep the following in mind :

  • The string-generated frequencies may fall within one band or the other and the best musical point of separation should be set by ear.
  • The Twain’s crossover filters are first-order filters, which means that there is a wide overlap of frequencies at the intersection of the two bands. That means that very clinical (vertical) separation of bands is not possible. As bands are separated at the crossover’s set point, they gently fade out into each other, along with inherent phase inversion.
  • The crossover point may actually separate the string’s frequency and they can be processed in the resulted bands. From a broad perspective, it seems that the ear favors a separation point in between 225Hz – 350Hz for guitar and in between 125Hz – 225Hz for bass. Practical needs may differ and the crossover should be set for each intended application.
  • Twain’s crossover can be a powerful tool on the Dry line. Due to the complementary saturation engines with independent Level controls and additional High Pass and Low Pass filters for lows and highs, these act like a dedicated preamp for the Dry line only. These can be used to tailor the tone more precisely, complementing the parallel compression – blend more or fewer lows or more or fewer highs on the Wet Line, as needed.
  • The Make-up Gains on the Wet line can act as a tilted equalization, with the pivot variable frequency set by the crossover.

CompIQ Twain Crossover Frequencies & Best Saturation Range

Dry Line saturation

While the preamp positive trimming might be useful to attack the compressors with a hotter signal (and this is more desirable for instrument-level signals), the Dry line is also amplified and may trigger the saturation engines down the line, even if the Saturation knobs are at a minimum. This is directly dependant on how high the input signal level is – for signals up to approx. +2dBu or 0dBV (2.82Vp-p), the Dry Line should stay perfectly clean.

When the preamp is trimmed to boost an already hot input signal is best to minimize the dry injection, unless the added saturation is desirable.

With Cut filters turned more clockwise, the saturation effect becomes more subtle.

General compression tips

  • Raise threshold instead of make-up gain for making the signal louder while containing noise.
  • Lower ratio before raising the threshold to reduce the compression feel.
  • Use soft knee and/or slower timing to reduce pops.
  • Use faster timing for percussive musical content when compression is used as an effect (country, chick’n’pickin).
  • Use hard knee to increase compression feel, before increasing ratio.
  • Combine higher ratios with soft knee and/or slower timings, for a more natural compression feel.
  • Combine lower threshold with lower ratio to maintain a transparent compression, and vice-versa.
  • Hard knee amplifies the compression feel. It accentuates even more if faster timings (both attack & release) are used.
  • Soft knee dilutes compression feel.

By its nature, a multiple-band compressor is highly dependent on input frequency content and input level, and because every instrument is differently equipped, these exact settings might sound different than what you expect by reading our explanations.

We advise you to explore the settings one by one, to hear their action. Small adjustments on pairs of controls can make a big difference. It is always best to start with high thresholds, 1:1 ratio, and make-up gains at noon, and then increase the ratios and lower the threshold. To better hear the crossover, amplify the lows make-up gain and lower the highs make-up gain. And vice-versa.

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Setting Examples

Dual Band – Light Airy Compression

The crossover is set around 250Hz. A lower ratio of 3:1 ensures the compression feel yet being transparent enough. Raising thresholds just a bit further aids in that. The Side Chain Filter is in Low position to free the transients a little. The Lows side is compressed with Soft Knee and Slower Timing, and this also contributes both to transparency and compression feel. To amplify the compression feel the Highs band is compressed with Hard Knee. Slower timings on this side were intended to compensate for the Hard knee. Make-up gains were set to balance the bypassed signal.

On the Dry Line, the Highs were amplified quite a lot at 75%, but they were gently injected with the Mix over the Wet line, for balancing the on-purpose accentuated compression. This results in a crisp and airy compression, which is almost unnoticeable until the playing becomes more aggressive.

Tips & Tricks

  • Raising the input in the preamp section will drive the compressors harder, for a stronger feel.
  • Switching to Fast timing on Highs or both bands increases the compression feel.
  • Switching Highs Knee to Soft will dilute the compression.
  • Switching Side Chain Filter to Deep will further add body to the signal.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Dual Band - Light Airy Compression

Dual Band – Light Airy Compression

Dual Band – Grabby & Plucky Compression

This is a stronger setting, which is suitable for funky or country playing, not so much usable for open chords. This setting applies very well to a brighter Stratocaster or a mid-punchy bass.

The Crossover is set around 100Hz, pretty low, to bloom up the high energy Lows only. The Ratio on the Highs band is increased to 5:1. Soft Knee and Fast Timing on this side are balancing each other. With Side Chain Filter set to Normal, the compression feel is strong.  That is more accentuated by the Hard Knee on the Lows band, but ease out by the Slower Timing on this side. Thresholds are just raised a bit to free some audio body and just a little of the Dry line with amplified Highs is injected back for more air.

Tips & Tricks

  • Add more transparency by blending in more Dy Highs.
  • Raise the thresholds and lower the Make-up Gain to reduce hissing from amplification.
  • Use the Preamp Trimmer to soften or amplify the feel.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Dual Band - Grabby & Plucky Compression

Dual Band – Grabby & Plucky Compression

Dual Band – Saturated Compression

The intent here is to add harmonic distortions over the compression. Keep in mind, this effect is applied to the Dry-line only and runs in parallel with the compressed Wet-line. This setting is very suitable for soloing with a guitar with humbuckers.

The compression ratio is kept low at around 3:1 and the Side Chain Filter is set to Low, so that transients are not triggering the compression too early and flatten the Lows. Soft Knee and higher threshold on the Lows band dilutes the compression feel on this side. With the Crossover set around 300Hz, some saturation can still be applied on the Lows side. On the Highs band, the compression is accentuated by the Hard Knee and Faster Timing, but raising the threshold leaves a part of the amplitudes free from compression, which helps with general transparency.

The Mix injects a good portion of the Dry signal over the Wet-line, and the saturation is added on both bands. The dry levels on both bands are raised so that the saturation level is increased.

Tips & Tricks

  • Add more saturation grind by raising the Crossover higher and inject more Lows saturation.
  • Add more tubescreamer effect by lowering the Crossover and increasing the Highs saturation along with Highs dry level.
  • Set the Crossover around 300-350Hz for the best results when saturating both bands.
  • Set Side Chain Filter to Normal for more compression feel or to Deep, to dilute the compression in favor of dry harmonics.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Dual Band - Saturated Compression

Dual Band – Saturated Compression

Dual Band – Sustaining Compression

This is a heavy compression setting and as a result will add more sustain. This is also clean and 100% wet compression.

The Slower Timing is set on both bands to raise the release of compression. A very high ratio of 10:1 is set on the Lows side, and the Soft Knee prevents some pumping which may still occur, moreover because the Side Chain Filter is set to Normal. The thresholds are raised higher on both bands to free up the body of sound. The Highs ratio is set lower at 5:1 but it is still a lot of compressing here, which is more accentuated by the Hard Knee. Compression is balanced with the Crossover set to around 200Hz.

Tips & Tricks

  • Raise the thresholds and lower the make-up gains to contain noise.
  • Use preamp trimming to accentuate or dilute the settings.
  • Mix back Dry signal to regain the transients.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Dual Band - Sustaining Compression

Dual Band – Sustaining Compression

Stacked – Dynamic CALIfornia 76

We had the opportunity to play with the wonderful Cali76 Compact Deluxe from Origin Effects and loved the Dynamic Control setting as suggested in their manual. We tried to replicate that with the Twain. These are two different technology pedals. The Cali76 compression circuit is based on Urei’s famous FET design, which in Origin’s implementation has a moderate ratio range and relatively slow timings. The Twain is a dual-engine compressor based on Blackmer VCA’s with independent threshold controls, auto-timing presets, and knee selection options – on both engines. However, we got close to the feel & punch and we encourage you to try these settings. We used single-coil guitars to test this, but it should work with any instrument, including bass.

The pedal is put in Stacked mode (mainly because this is the only way to prolong the auto-timings), and the Crossover is set around 250Hz. We use this to inject some shine into the Dry line, but we don’t separate higher than this, because we need some meat to work with. Moreover, we increase the Lows Level a bit as well. The Level on the Dry Highs is increased to the max and the Dry Lows almost completely cut with the high pass filter. This is the most important part of the setting because this way we push up the highs close to the sparklings of the Cali76 which is well known to add to the top end.

The rest of the settings are pretty straight forward. Mellow ratios and the thresholds are raised just a tad. The Side Chain Filter is set to Low, to pass out some of the energy to the second processing engine. The preamp trimmer is raised a little to get more punch from the dynamic circuits which act in series.

Tips & Tricks

  • Raise preamp input trimmer to accentuate the feel.
  • Lower the ratio to reduce pumping, and adjust the gains accordingly.
  • Raise the ratios in both engines while adding more Dry to the mix.
  • Add Highs saturation in the Dry line to resemble the drive that Cali76 enters easily when pushed hard.

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Stacked – Gluey Sweet Sustain

This is a subtle setting, where a minor adjustment in the knobs will result in a strong change of the compression feel.

In Stacked mode (where one engine sends everything to the next), and with ratios at an exaggerated limiting setting, the compression feel is controlled through thresholds, side-chain filter, gains, and wet/dry blend. The aim is to have the sweetest compression, at the brink of popping but not quite.

Both timings are slower to prolong the consecutive release and the second engine is set to a hard knee, to keep the signal more in sustain. Part of the raw signal is freed up in the first engine only to be sent to the next for the second compression. There too, the threshold is higher, so we will pass some of the signal compressed in the first engine to be less amplified by the second make-up gain. With limiting ratios, a lot of gains would be needed, and that would introduce amplification noise that we try to avoid. We amplify a little more in the first engine, and that means the second one will deal with a stronger signal, but here the threshold is raised a little higher, for compensation. Now, we amplify a little less in the second, to avoid introducing noise. Use the two make-up gain controls in reverse tandem to achieve the desired signal level.

The side-chain filter is employed in the first engine because we want to preserve more of the lows transients which are partially & progressively passed-through, underneath the thresholds.

The Mix is the master dial. With the crossover at around 250Hz (could be set higher still) we amplify the highs in the dry signal, to brighten up the mix. Saturations are raised in both bands to the level where they are almost inaudible; leave them there to transfer some harmonic distortions to the peaks of the compressed signal.

Tips & Tricks

  • Use input preamp to change everything with one knob.
  • Dialing dry out with the Mix knob will accentuate the compression feel but highs will be washed out as well. Depending on how bright your instrument is, this acts as a master tone control.
  • Tiny adjustments in thresholds yield very audible changes; the same is valid for make-up gains. Each should compensate for its counterpart in the other engine.
  • Using a pick will pluck the sound.
  • Using fingers especially with bass will make everything glue naturally.
  • This setting is very suitable for funky playing or country style.

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Stacked - Gluey Sweet Sustaining Compression

Stacked – Gluey Sweet Sustaining Compression

Stacked – Warm Clean Optipression

This setting is intended to gently amplify the compression feel given by optical compressors, but without distortions that those introduce. The pedal is put into Stacked mode which means the Crossover is not used on the Wet line. It is still available for the Dry line, and that matters, because we chose to inject more Dry Highs to polish and shine up the compression. The compression engines are in now series.

The thresholds are almost to the lowest point for both bands. It means the compressors act almost immediately, and whatever was freed-up in the first engine (Lows) will inherently be compressed in the next. There is no need to high ratios – just around 3.5:1 should be maxing used, but there are no rules here; it is just the noise from one compressor is transferred and amplified by the next, so proper tweaking is required to contain that. Both compressors are slowed down by setting Slower Timing and Soft Knee. To balance the accentuated compression feel of this setting, the Side Chain Filter is set to Low. Setting it to Deep, means more Lows transients are compressed in the next engine.

The Dry Highs are amplified but not saturated and injected boldly over the Wet line. This reshapes the higher frequency content giving this set a natural feel, albeit the whole setting is very aggressive. This also helps to lower the make-up gains and consequently containing the overall noise.

Tips & Tricks

  • Use the Preamp trimmer to accentuate or soften the feel.
  • Set the Crossover higher to inject fewer mids through the Dry/Wet Mix.
  • Play with thresholds in small increments on each side while compensating with make-up gains.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Stacked - Warm Clean Optipression

Stacked – Warm Clean Optipression

Stacked or Dual Band – Limiting Lows & Compressing Highs

This setting is a variation of the previous one. While in Stacked mode, the first engine only compresses the peaks and the second acts as a full compressor. In the first engine, the threshold is raised a lot and it is set to affect just high dynamic strokes. A high ratio of 10:1, Hard Knee, Faster Timing, and Normal Side Chain Filter set this engine into limiting mode.

The next engine is set with a lower ratio above 3:1, Soft Knee, and Slower Timing. The threshold here is also raised to prevent overcompressing and keeping it sound natural. Because both thresholds are higher, the sound has enough energy so less make-up gain is used. this also contains the noise.

A little Dry signal with amplified Highs is added over the compressed Wet line, to balance everything and make the setting more neutral.

The same strategy can be used in Dual Band mode. That will result in even more transparency. The Lows will barely be touched by the limiter while the compression feel will come solely from the Highs engine.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Stacked - Limiting Lows & Compressing Highs

Stacked – Limiting Lows & Compressing Highs

Stacked – Gritty Blooming Compression

With this setting, we tried to achieve a blooming compression with added harmonics grit that is suitable for a mid-scooped pickup (we used a Telecaster with the pickup switch in the middle position, hence combining the bridge and neck pickups). With minor adjustments, this setting complemented the crispy bridge humbucker in the same Tele.

The pedal is put in Stacked mode, and the Crossover is set higher, around 800Hz, to allow proper injection of Lows & Highs saturation. That seems to be a magic spot where both saturations feel right. With ratios set to 4:1 in both engines, Normal Side Chain Filter and make-up gains at noon, we use thresholds to balance the compression level, so noise from consecutive amplification is reduced. Hard Knees were set for both engines and, to amplify the compression feel, we raised the input preamp with +3dB, pushing compressors even more. This gives the compression an elastic feel, resembling an optical compressor. Both timings are set Slower and that adds more to the effect.

On the Dry line we injected saturation in both bands, with more of it added to the Highs (where harmonic distortions feel more musical). Some of the shrills were ducked on the Highs using the Hi-Cut Filter. We did the same on the Lows side to make the grind just barely perceptible. Wet and Dry lines are perfectly evened out with the  Mix knob.

Tips & Tricks

  • Add more bloom by raising the thresholds.
  • Lower crossover for adding grit or raise it higher to soften the grit and pump more bloom.
  • Set the Crossover around 300-350Hz for the best results when saturating both bands.
  • Switch to Soft Knee on both engines to favor more distortions.
  • Raise input level even higher to add more elastic feel.

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CompIQ Twain - Settings Examples - Stacked - Gritty Blooming Compression

Stacked – Gritty Blooming Compression

Premier Guitar – Victor Brodén Compression

Sound demos courtesy of Victor Brodén who wrote an in-depth Twain review in the Premier Guitar October 2020 Pedal Issue, p.116. Recorded direct using a Mbox and running Logic X.

Clip 1 – Dual-Band

Fender Ultra Jazz 4 (60/40 favoring neck pickup). Band 1: Threshold 10 o’clock, ratio 11 o’clock, gain 11 o’clock, x-over 11 o’clock. Band 2: Threshold 2 o’clock, ratio noon, mix 11 o’clock, gain 11 o’clock, dual-band mode, fast timing on the low side, and slow timing for the highs.

“I started out by plugging in a Fender Ultra Jazz 4-string because I wanted to see if I could get a modern, active Jazz bass to sound a little less modern and controlled, both in the highs of the pops and the violent low-end attacks of an aggressively slapped 4th string. And I began using the CompIQ TWAIN in dual-band mode with a 3:1 compression ratio. I switched things up with fast timing on the low side and slow timing for the highs. I was instantly struck by how musical my intentionally heavy squash on the low register sounded. The popped notes lost just a little bit of their inherent harshness and fit better into the line I was playing, a bit like slapping through a tube preamp.”

Clip 2 – Stacked

1985 Yamaha BB3000S, with tone at 50 percent and neck pickup only. Band 1: Threshold 10 o’clock, ratio 1 o’clock, gain 10 o’clock, x-over 8 o’clock. Band 2: Threshold 5 o’clock, ratio 11 noon, mix 8 o’clock, gain 10 o’clock, stacked mode, soft knee.

“To me, the true test of a great compressor is to determine how it can “glue” a track together with a bass line that features long note values. I grabbed an early ’80s Yamaha BB3000S, engaged the stacked mode, set a soft knee, and utilized the wet side of the signal heavily. I was rewarded with a truly old-school fat—but not muddy—tone, where my low notes were warm, and my high notes gained a tremendous amount of body and authority.”

Clip 3 – Stacked & Saturation

1985 Yamaha BB3000S, with both pickups dimed. Band 1: Threshold 10 o’clock, ratio 10 o’clock, gain 10 o’clock, x-over 2 o’clock. Band 2: Threshold 11 o’clock, ratio 11, mix 11 o’clock, gain 10 o’clock, stacked mode, saturation controls 3 o’clock.

“Since the stacked mode put such a smile on my face, I kept it engaged while rolling all controls on my Yamaha to their wide-open positions and playing meat-and-potatoes rock with a pick, and boosting the saturation controls on the TWAIN up to 3 o’clock. The pedal added a pleasant mid-scoop while providing an audible saturation with the bass soloed, but a saturation subtle enough to where it will just add presence to the bass in a track without having a forward, audible break-up like a fuzz—a very usable feature indeed.”

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Blog post: CompIQ Twain Settings Examples

Video Demo / Bass

Adrian Ciuplea plays and demonstrates different sounds of the CompIQ STELLA Compressor

Video Demo / Bass

CompIQ Twain Setting Example for Bass - Dynamic CALIfornia 76 - Stacked Compression

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COMPARE COMPRESSORS

The comparison table is best viewed on large screens, in landscape mode, preferably on desktop.

Circuit Design
Dynamic Processing
Analog Engines
Variation Element
Side-Chain Detection
Side-Chain Filter
Side-Chain Frequency Compensation
Adjustable Input Level
Input Clipping LED
Crossover
Ratio
Threshold
Dynamic Auto Timing
Attack
Release
Make-up Gain
Compression Knee
EQ
EQ Bypass
Dry/Wet Mix
Saturation
Saturation EQ
Compression Display
9V Battery Operation
External DC Power
DC Power Plug Barrel
Current Consumption
Compressor / Limiter
Dual Band / Stacking
2
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Low / Deep
lows only
YES
-9dB to +6dB
> +6dBu signal levels
Linkwitz–Riley
70Hz to 1KHz
1:1 to inf:1
both bands
-40dBu to +10dBu
both bands
Auto Fast / Slower
both bands
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
-6dB to +20dB
both bands
Hard / Soft
both bands
Through Make-up Gains on Wet line (boost/cut)
-
YES
On Dry Line
adjustable
Lo / Hi Cut filters and Level controls
6-LED
both bands
-
9-18VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 69mA
Compressor / Limiter
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Low / Deep
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
-40dBu to +10dBu
Auto Fast / Slower
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
Manual: 0.12 ms/dB to 12 ms/dB
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
Manual: 1.2 ms/dB to 120 ms/dB
-6dB to +20dB
Hard / Soft
X-EQ +/-6dB with Low / Deep frequency pivots
YES
YES
On Dry Line
adjustable
Lo / Hi cut filters
(inside jumpers)
8-LED
YES
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 29mA
Compressor / Limiter
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal / Deep
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
-40dbu to +10dBu
Auto Fast / Slower
F / S: 5‐7ms / 10-15ms
F / S: 70ms / 100‐220ms
-6dB to +20dB
Hard / Soft
-
-
YES
-
-
5-LED
-
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 25mA
Compressor
Single Channel
1
Blackmer® VCA
True RMS-Level Sensor
Normal
YES
-
-
-
1:1 to inf:1
Lo: -40dBu / Hi: -30dBu
Auto Slow
12ms
220ms
-6dB to +20dB
Hard
-
-
YES
-
-
5-LED
-
9-12VDC center negative
Ø 5.1/2.1mm, 12mm long
< 25mA

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